Triple M Corner no.69

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Just 44 Montlhery, or ‘C’ Type MG Midgets were built in 1931-32 and a surprising number survive to this day. One such survivor is a 1931 car RX 8306, currently owned and still used competitively by Chris Cadman. This photo may or may not be of Chris’s  car. It was taken at the spring 1932 MAC Shelsley meeting and shows a C Type with its number plate partly obscured.  It’s established that another C Type was registered as RX 8586 and so this photo may be of that car (LATplate B8591)

Wolseley Hornet specials no.22

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Pictured above is PJ 37, a 1931 Surrey registered Abbey Hornet special. The occasion was the 1932 running of the MCC Sporting Trial which took place on 15th October that year, centered upon Buxton in Derbyshire. In this photograph the car was being driven by J.J. Kennedy who was one of 28 drivers to collect a Premier Award from among the 80 crews that started the event. Compared with other national trials organised by the MCC, the Sporting Trial was a short half-day affair comprising just five observed sections (three of which were covered twice) over a distance of only 46.5 miles. (LAT Motor Sport image)

Hornet Specials no.21

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1931 Wolseley Hornet Coupe

Rarer than many Wolseley Hornet Specials this factory produced two-seater Coupe was not a big seller despite being competitively priced at £215. (The smaller MG Midget Sportsman’s Coupe sold for £245) LAT Images Photoscan

Hornet Specials no.20

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1931 McEvoy Hornet Special GK 4084 was owned by A. J. Bochaton and appeared in a series of national trials between 1934 and 1936. In this photo, the car is being enthusiastically driven at the MCC’s London-Gloucester Trial (held on 7th December 1935) while climbing a narrow green lane somewhere in the Cotswolds. The Network’s photo archive holds three further images of this car/driver combination and in each photo, the car is trailing a smokey exhaust, which in view of the car’s age, already four years old at this time and its competition pedigree could indicate the need for imminent engine surgery. If that was the case on 7th December 1935 it didn’t hinder Bochaton as he went on to win a first class award for his efforts.

Triple M corner no.67

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1931 MG C Type Midget was a supercharged short stroke 746 cc racing car. Fourteeen examples were built prior to the third and final JCC Brooklands Double Twelve race of 8th and 9th May 1931, five of these cars occupying the top five places at the race’s conclusion. Just a few weeks later two C Types took part in the Le Mans 24 Hour race, neither car being classified as a finisher. The C Type driven by the Hon. Mrs Chetwynd and H.H. Stisted completed just 30 laps while that driven bt Sir Francis Samuelson was disqualified for failing to complete the final lap in under 30 minutes. The car pictured above is that driven by Samuelson. (LAT Motor Sport negative)

Triple M corner no.66

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

With snow on the ground, J. F. Kemp pilots his 1932 Birmingham registered MG J2 Midget (OJ 6978) along a frozen and rutted section of byway. The date is 23rd February 1935 and Kemp is taking part in that years running of the SUNBAC Colmore Cup Trial. He completed the course and gained a Third Class award. (LATplate C5309)

Triple M corner no.65

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1933 MG J2 Midget JH 4140 is seen here taking part in the 1935 running of the MCC’s ‘Edinburgh’ trial while being driven by O.M. Dixon. The car is negotiating Wrynose Pass on 8th June in the Lake District National Park where gradients of 25% can be expected. In 1935 this pass was an unmetalled road or loose gravel track which proved to be a real test for many of the cars. Dixon won a Bronze Award for his efforts. This seven minute YouTube video shows a ‘modern’ tackling the pass in October 2011.(LATplate C6347)

Triple M corner no.64

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

By January 1936 Essex registered 1931 MG Midget VX 6845 was four and a half years old and some way distant from the model’s competitive heyday in the early years of that decade. However this M Type was far from alone. There were plenty more representatives of the the early Midget taking part in competitive events up and down the country throughout this period – and not just in club competitions such as this one. Cowbourne’s epic tome, British Trial Drivers – Their cars and awards 1929-1939 includes a photograph of Bacon’s 1931 M Type CV 5127 taking part in the 1939 ‘Exeter’. The photograph above (LATplate C7834) was taken at the Kentish Border Trial in January 1936 although the names of the crew are unknown.

Triple M corner no.63

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Frank Ashby & Sons along with V.W. Derrington, James Grose, Brown Bros, Halfords, Gamages and others sold a vast array of accessories for the pre-war car owner. No one was better catered for than owners of cars with sporting pretentions. This Frank Ashby half page ad from the 23rd June 1933 edition of the Light Car & Cyclecar was aimed directly at these owners with their ‘Brooklands’ range. It’s interesting to note that their fully-flexible steering wheels were standard equipment on a host of sporting models, while MG clearly preferred Bluemel products.

Triple M corner no.62

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Bugatti Owner’s Club held regular events on Gold Hill Common, Chalfont-St-Peter, Bucks throughout the early thirties. The gravel byway from the village to the top of the hill provided the track, with competitors generating thick clouds of dust as they negotiatiated the bends. Here 1930 MG Midget MG 764 commences the climb with an unknown driver at the wheel.