Triple M corner no.56

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

J. B. Carver and his 1930 London registered MG Midget GC 5505 featured in many trials during the early thirties. This Motor Sport image shows him about to leave the car park of the Crown Inn, Marlow on a wet November morning prior to competing in the 1932 running of the Inter Varsity Trial between teams from the Oxford and Cambridge universities. His motoring activities could not have left much time for study as the club badges adorning the front of his Midget would indicate that he had a passion for sporting motoring. The r/h LAT sourced scan was taken from a celluloid negative retained in their archive, while the l/h image is a scan taken directly from the December 1932 edition of the magazine. (Page 52)

N.B. To see the respective images in full – drag the arrows to either the right or the left.

Triple M corner no.55

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

During 1930 and 1931 the original MG Midget was entered for many trials and at most events outnumbered other popular models . The 1931 running of the London-Gloucester trial (12th December) was one such event where 13 Midgets took part, including that of N.H. Cole, his car (OU 3146) being registered in Hampshire in 1930.  He is seen here piloting OU 3146 up Ferriscourt which was a timed section on this trial. He finished in the awards winning a Silver Cup for his efforts. (LATplate B5246)

Hornet Specials no.18

By | Hornet Specials, Triple M corner

F.H. Boyd-Carpenter made his name  tuning and racing Austin Sevens from the mid-twenties onward. In 1926 he established his own coachbuilding business in Kilburn, N.W. London and from 1928 produced a pointed-tail Austin Seven Special. This was to be followed by the ‘Junior’ model, an unglamourous (and inexpensive) Morris Minor special in 1930. His company were quick off the mark when the Wolseley Hornet was launched in April 1930 when just a few months later this good looking special (based upon his Austin Seven design) took to the streets. By the standards of the day it was an expensive Hornet option with a £232-10s price tag, although surviving images testify that at least three found customers. (LAT Motor Sport nagative)

Triple M corner no.54

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1933 running of the MCC London-Gloucester Trial took place on Saturday 9th December with the 149 competitors (a record entry) leaving the car park of the Bridge House Hotel, Staines, Middx from 12:01 AM. The crews were then tasked with completing an all night drive before arriving in Cheltenham for their breakfast stop from 5:00 AM onwards. Competitors were then further obliged to complete the 12 observed test hill sections before finishing a gruelling almost 12 hour drive at Rodborough Common, Glos. The MG J2 Midget JD 2741 seen in this image was driven by T.C. Taylor who went on to collect a Silver Medal, one of only 14 such awards that day. (LATplate Motor X789)

Wolseley Hornet specials no. 17

By | Hornet Specials, Triple M corner

GP 8217 was registered in London during 1931 therefore one of the early Swallow built Hornet Two-seater specials. The car is seen here taking part in the 1932 MCC London-Lands End Trial with C. F. Harris at the wheel. This image was shot at an unknown location on 26th March 1932 by a photographer using celluloid film in his camera, the resulting negatives producing far less detail than that seen on glass plates. C.F. Harris failed to collect an award and retired from the event. (An LAT Motor Sport image)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.16

By | Hornet Specials, Triple M corner

1932 Wolseley Hornet March Special

Kevill-Davies & March of Bruton Street, London W.1 marketed a number of ‘specials’ from early 1932 onwards. One of their earliest designs was an open two+two body for the Wolseley Hornet chassis as seen in this April 1932 Autocar image, with a body supplied by the coachbuilder John Charles of Kew. There is a strong claim that these Freddie March designed bodies were the first to feature fully swept front wings, a styling cue that was to become a design hallmark of British thirties sports cars. (LATplate E2670)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.15

By | Triple M corner

Swallow Hornet Special

Arguably one of the prettiest Hornet Specials to leave a coachbuilder’s workshop was also one of the earliest of this variant to be built. The Swallow Hornet two-seater (£225) made its first appearance in November of 1930 to be joined the following October by an open four-seat model. It was sold exclusively by the Henlys concern who heavily advertised the vehicle in The Autocar, The Motor & The Light Car and soon versions were to be found taking part in the major sporting events of the day. Two of the striking features that made the Swallow Hornet two-seater stand out from the crowd were its three-piece raked windscreen and Alvis like beetle-back rear end. The finish on this later (1933) car looks magnificent in this photograph taken immediately outside the Henlys showroom in Great Portland Street, Central London. (LATplate E2071)

Wolseley Hornet specials no.14

By | Triple M corner

1933 Jensen Hornet four-seat Sports Saloon Special

Such is this car’s shape that a quick glance at its profile could lead the viewer to believe that he was looking at a two seat Hornet Coupe. The stylish back windows provide the clue to the additional rear seats while the vinyl covering to the roof and dummy pram-irons are period fashion items. The opening boot and trafficators indicate that this is a well-equipped version of the genre while its rear-hinged doors hark back to the twenties but none-the-less permit far easier access for rear-seat passengers. Jensen built other Hornet special types including a detachable trunk version of this model. (Image LAT E plate – reference obscured)

Triple M corner no.53

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This 1931 MG Midget (DG 2327) may be familiar to those who view this page regularly as it has previously featured in an IOTW (no.377). As reported there these images were all captured on the Isle of Man and were taken to appear in an as yet undiscovered article in The Autocar magazine. This photo was taken in the centre of Douglas perhaps at the junction of Prospect Hill and Victoria Street and provides an interesting view of the car, resplendent with a full set of badges including that of the Junior Car Club together with a ‘lucky’ horseshoe. The motorcycle combination JW 1656 was almost certainly the property of another island tourist in that it was first registered in Wolverhampton in 1932. (LAT Plate E3928)

Triple M corner no.52

By | Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This 1932 Wolseley Hornet Special (GX 6560), driven by a female, is seen here taking on an MG F Type Magna (GX 430) at the June 1932 running of the BARC’s Inter Club Meeting at Brooklands. There is another LAT image (B8511) of the two cars together on the starting line. If the names of the crews are known please contact the website at info@prewarminor.com (LATplate B8509)

Postscript: Thanks to Dick Serjeantson’s booklet Hornets at Brooklands (Wolseley Hornet Specials Club) it can be revealed that the female driver of the EW Daytona is none other than Kay Petre who was making her Brooklands debut. The driver of the Magna was Doddy Moncrieff.